Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day: Revisiting Islam’s Greatest Slaughter of Christians

Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day: Revisiting Islam’s Greatest Slaughter of Christians

by Raymond Ibrahim
PJ Media
April 24, 2019

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April 24 marks the “Great Crime,” that is, the genocide of Christians—mostly Armenians but also Assyrians—that took place under the Islamic Ottoman Empire throughout World War I. Then, the Turks liquidated approximately 1.5 million Armenians and 300,000 Assyrians.

Most objective American historians who have studied the question unequivocally agree that it was a deliberate, calculated genocide:

More than one million Armenians perished as the result of execution, starvation, disease, the harsh environment, and physical abuse. A people who lived in eastern Turkey for nearly 3,000 years [more than double the amount of time the invading Islamic Turks had occupied Anatolia, now known as “Turkey”] lost its homeland and was profoundly decimated in the first large-scale genocide of the twentieth century. At the beginning of 1915 there were some two million Armenians within Turkey; today there are fewer than 60,000…. Despite the vast amount of evidence that points to the historical reality of the Armenian Genocide, eyewitness accounts, official archives, photographic evidence, the reports of diplomats, and the testimony of survivors, denial of the Armenian Genocide by successive regimes in Turkey has gone on from 1915 to the present.

Similarly, in 1920, U.S. Senate Resolution 359 heard testimony that included evidence of “[m]utilation, violation, torture, and death [which] have left their haunting memories in a hundred beautiful Armenian valleys, and the traveler in that region is seldom free from the evidence of this most colossal crime of all the ages.”

In her memoir, Ravished ArmeniaAurora Mardiganian described being raped and thrown into a harem (consistent with Islam’s rules of war). Unlike thousands of other Armenian girls who were discarded after being defiled, she managed to escape. In the city of Malatia, she saw 16 Christian girls crucified: “Each girl had been nailed alive upon her cross,” she wrote, “spikes through her feet and hands, only their hair blown by the wind, covered their bodies.” Such scenes were portrayed in the 1919 documentary film Auction of Souls, some of which is based on Mardiganian’s memoirs.

Whereas the genocide is largely acknowledged in the West, one of its primary if not fundamental causes is habitually overlooked: religion. The genocide is usually articulated through a singularly secular paradigm, one that factors only things that are intelligible from a secular, Western point of view—such as identity and gender politics, nationalism, and territorial disputes. Such an approach does little more than project modern Western perspectives onto vastly different civilizations and eras.

War, of course, is another factor that clouds the true face of the genocide. Because these atrocities mostly occurred during World War I, so the argument goes, they are ultimately a reflection of just that—war, in all its chaos and destruction, and nothing more. But as Winston Churchill, who described the massacres as an “administrative holocaust,” correctly observed, “The opportunity [WWI] presented itself for clearing Turkish soil of a Christian race.” Even Adolf Hitler had pointed out that “Turkey is taking advantage of the war in order to thoroughly liquidate its internal foes, i.e., the indigenous Christians, without being thereby disturbed by foreign intervention.”

It’s worth noting that little has changed; in the context of war in Iraq, Syria, and Libya, the first to be targeted for genocide have been Christians and other minorities.

But even the most cited factor of the Armenian Genocide, “ethnic identity conflict,” while legitimate, must be understood in light of the fact that, historically, religion accounted more for a person’s identity than language or heritage. This is daily demonstrated throughout the Islamic world today, where Muslim governments and Muslim mobs persecute Christian minorities who share the same race, ethnicity, language, and culture; minorities who are indistinguishable from the majority—except, of course, for being non-Muslims, or “infidels.”

As one Armenian studies professor asks, “If it [the Armenian Genocide] was a feud between Turks and Armenians, what explains the genocide carried out by Turkey against the Christian Assyrians at the same time?”

Indeed, according to a 2017 book, Year of the Sword: The Assyrian Christian Genocide:

[The] policy of ethnic cleansing was stirred up by pan-Islamism and religious fanaticism. Christians were considered infidels ( kafir). The call to Jihad, decreed on 29 November 1914 and instigated and orchestrated for political ends, was part of the plan” to “combine and sweep over the lands of Christians and to exterminate them.” As with the Armenians, eyewitness accounts tell of the sadistic eye-gouging of Assyrians and the gang rape of their children on church altars. According to key documents, all this was part of “an Ottoman plan to exterminate Turkey’s Christians.

To understand how the historic genocide of Armenians and Assyrians is representative of the modern-day plight of Christians under Islam, one need only read the following words written in 1918 by President Theodore Roosevelt; however, read “Armenian” as “Christian” and “Turkish” as “Islamic,” as supplied in brackets:

the Armenian [Christian] massacre was the greatest crime of the war, and the failure to act against Turkey [the Islamic world] is to condone it… the failure to deal radically with the Turkish [Islamic] horror means that all talk of guaranteeing the future peace of the world is mischievous nonsense.

Indeed, if we “fail to deal radically” with the “horror” currently being visited upon millions of Christians around the Islamic world—which in some areas reached genocidal proportions—we “condone it” and had better cease talking “mischievous nonsense” of a utopian world of peace and tolerance.

Put differently, silence is always the ally of those who would liquidate the “other.” In 1915, Adolf Hitler rationalized his genocidal plans, which he implemented some three decades later, when he rhetorically asked: “Who, after all, speaks today of the annihilation of the Armenians?”

And who among today’s major politicians speaks—let alone does anything—about the ongoing annihilation of Christians by Muslims, most recently (but not singularly) seen in the Easter Sunday church bombings of Sri Lanka that left over 300 dead?

Raymond Ibrahim, author of the new book, Sword and Scimitar, Fourteen Centuries of War between Islam and the West, is a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Gatestone Institute and a Judith Friedman Rosen Fellow at the Middle East Forum.

Sri Lanka: Cardinal Believes Muslim Envoys Who Assure Him That the Jihad Bombings Had “No Connection to Islam”

Sri Lanka: Cardinal Believes Muslim Envoys Who Assure Him That the Jihad Bombings Had “No Connection to Islam”

APR 26, 2019 12:00 PM BY CHRISTINE DOUGLASS-WILLIAMS60 COMMENTS

The Catholic archbishop of Colombo, Malcolm Ranjith, “met with ambassadors of Islamic countries who expressed condolences over the deadly Easter Sunday suicide bombings and assured him, he said, that there was ‘no connection to Islam.’” No one who thinks could possibly take this seriously. To understand the 1,400-year link between bloody jihad conquest and normative Islam, read The History of Jihad: From Muhammad to ISIS. Muhammad also instructed his followers that “war is deceit” (Bukhari 4.52.268).

Yet Cardinal Ranjith believes the ambassadors, who were from countries including Turkey (where leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan aims to “decimate” the Kurds, etc., and had Turkish soldiers recite the Qur’an before going out to battle them); Pakistan (known for its cruel blasphemy laws and violent persecution of Christians);  Egypt (where Muslim Brotherhood violent persecution of Christians continues); Qatar (a Salafi state funder of jihad terror); and Saudi Arabia (a Wahhabi state funder of jihad terror). Ranjith was so pleased by the meeting that he fell for the ambassadors’ words of deceit, stating: “We are very happy and thankful to the ambassadors of the Islamic countries for having coming here to express their solidarity with us.”

Ranjith stands in stark contrast to high-ranking Vatican Cardinal Robert Sarah, prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, who understands the nature of the jihad. Sarah has compared “the modern influx of Muslim migrants to the invasions of barbarian tribes that ultimately brought down the Roman Empire in a.d. 475.”

“Sri Lanka Cardinal Says Muslim Envoys Assured Him Bombings Had ‘No Connection to Islam,’” by Patrick Goodenough, CNS News, April 25, 2019:

(CNSNews.com) – The Catholic archbishop of Colombo met Wednesday with ambassadors of Islamic countries who expressed condolences over the deadly Easter Sunday suicide bombings and assured him, he said, that there was “no connection to Islam.”

The Islamic terrorist group ISIS claimed responsibility for eight bombings, whose targets included three churches and four hotels. The death toll has continued to rise, reaching 359 on Wednesday.

Sri Lankan police said eight suicide bombers have been identified. Deputy defense minister Ruwan Wijewardene said one was a woman and that most were well-educated and from well-to-do families. At least 58 people have been arrested as investigations continue.

A video released by ISIS’ media arm showed eight alleged perpetrators pledging allegiance to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. All are masked except one, identified as Zahran Hashmi, a radical Sri Lankan Muslim imam.

The ambassadors of more than a dozen Muslim countries – among them Turkey, Pakistan, Egypt, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Iran – called on the archbishop, Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith.

“We are very happy and thankful to the ambassadors of the Islamic countries for having coming here to express their solidarity with us,” Ranjith told local media after their meeting.

He said the ambassadors had given their assurance that “what has happened is not something political or religious; it is something that has been probably the result of some misguided people, and maybe there are other forces behind those misguided people, but they are not – no connection to Islam.”

Ranjith said he told the envoys that Sri Lanka’s Catholics appreciate the country’s Islamic community, and that the attacks should in no way “harm the harmony and peace that exists between us – Christians, Buddhists, Hindus and Muslims together.”…..

The History of Jihad: From Muhammad to ISIS

The comprehensive history of the role of war and terror in the spread of Islam.

It is taken for granted, even among many Washington policymakers, that Islam is a fundamentally peaceful religion and that Islamic jihad terrorism is something relatively new, a product of the economic and political ferment of the twentieth century. But in The History of Jihad: From Muhammad to ISIS, Islamic scholar Robert Spencer proves definitively that Islamic terror is as old as Islam itself, as old as Muhammad, the prophet of Islam, who said “I have been made victorious through terror.”

Spencer briskly traces the 1,400-year war of Islamic jihadis against the rest of the world, detailing the jihad against Europe, including the 700-year struggle to conquer Constantinople; the jihad in Spain, where non-Muslims fought for another 700 years to get the jihadi invaders out of the country; and the jihad against India, where Muslim warriors and conquerors wrought unparalleled and unfathomable devastation in the name of their religion.

Told in great part in the words of contemporary chroniclers themselves, both Muslim and non-Muslim, The History of Jihad shows that jihad warfare has been a constant of Islam from its very beginnings, and present-day jihad terrorism proceeds along exactly the same ideological and theological foundations as did the great Islamic warrior states and jihad commanders of the past.

The History of Jihad: From Muhammad to ISIS is the first one-volume history of jihad in the English language, and the first book to tell the whole truth about Islam’s bloody history in an age when Islamic jihadis are more assertive in Western countries than they have been for centuries. This book is indispensable to understanding the geopolitical situation of the twenty-first century, and ultimately to formulating strategies to reform Islam and defeat radical terror.

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Blasphemy Death Sentence in Pakistan for Christian

Blasphemy Death Sentence in Pakistan for Christian

Death as Punishment “for Disbelief”: Extremist Persecution of Christians, February 2018

‘I was beaten and taken to a bathroom. I asked what was my mistake, and they [the police] replied that I was his cousin…. Later they asked me to pull his pants down and sodomize him. I refused.’ — Christian man, Pakistan. ‘One of the Boko Haram said,

Source: Death as Punishment “for Disbelief”: Extremist Persecution of Christians, February 2018

“We Are Bigger than Your Jesus!”

If any measure of peace between Muslims and Christians is to prevail, no church can exist in the village, local Muslims said. ‘The only houses of worship that can ever be built in this village are Muslim places of worship for Allah.’ — Watan

Source: “We Are Bigger than Your Jesus!”